All posts by pennylanequilts

Unique handmade quilts. Modern with a hint of vintage.

summer dyed

Our weather  has been perfect for dyeing fabric! Here are a few photos to share  from some recent dyeing sessions.

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First, the fabric is “scoured” by washing in warm water with soda ash and Synthrapol. It is then dried in the dryer.
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It’s helpful to refer back to notes from previous sessions.
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A journal (complete with fabric swatches) helps to inform choices for new color experiments.
A dust mask and rubber gloves are necessary safety precautions.
A dust mask and rubber gloves are necessary safety precautions.
Some beautiful fabrics waiting for the soda ash fixative to be added.
Some beautiful fabrics are waiting for the soda ash fixative to be added.
Each pie was placed in a plastic bag while it cured.
Each piece was placed in a plastic bag while it cured.
These fabrics were first rinsed outdoors in cold water to get most of the excess dye removed.
These fabrics were first rinsed outdoors in cold water to get most of the excess dye removed.
Then they were given another rinse indoors with hot water.
Then they were given another rinse indoors with hot water.
Ready for the final wash and rinse in the machine, adding Synthrapol to remove excess dye.
The final wash and rinse is in the machine, adding Synthrapol to remove excess dye.

And what could be more fun than sharing the experience with great friends?

I can’t wait to see what everyone creates with their new fabric choices!

introducing: penny lane quilts

Welcome to penny lane quilts, where I’ll share my creative process and give you a peek inside my studio.

I love piecing on vintage machines,

1946 electric Singer 201

cutting fabric into little pieces,

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hand quilting,

varner.marla.Coral Reef. detail

and looking out my window.

the view out my window

If you find something that interests you, I hope  you’ll stop by often and leave a comment now and then.

teach an old dog new tricks?

beautifully carved whale outside Jamestown S'Klallam Tribal Center
“Killer Whale” designed by Dale Faulstitch, carved by Dale Faulstitch,                          Nathan Gilles, Bud Turner and Harry Burlingame (2010)

At the Jamestown  S’Klallam Tribal Center, this “old dog” is working hard to learn “new tricks” in the Marketing Your Small Business class taught by Renne Emiko Brock-Richmond. The project is made possible through funding provided by the Washington State Library and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  The efforts of the tribal library staff have brought this wonderful opportunity to many local entrepreneurs. What a great way to learn new skills and network with other small business owners.